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Master of Ministry

Master of Ministry

Aim

To consolidate and enhance the skills required for an effective ministry within your missional context.

Focus

Our MMin is accredited by the ACD and is designed to provide professional development, research, and theological reflection for Christian leaders in ordained and lay ministry roles, with an emphasis on innovation. While course participants can select from a wide variety of subject areas, Trinity College Queensland prioritises the offering of units that aim to help you walk away with a pre-prepared sermon series.

The MMin is primarily for those in ministry who wish to reflect on aspects of their ministry. It may be a pathway to qualify for entry into research programs. This is a coursework postgraduate course.

Entry to the MMin normally requires:

  • A Bachelor of Ministry degree or equivalent qualification or the ACD Graduate Diploma in Ministry or equivalent qualification; and
  • At least two years’ relevant ministry experience; and
  • Permission of the Continuing Education for Ministry (CEM) Course Co-ordinator.

However under certain circumstances and subject to specific conditions, others students may be admitted who can show evidence of fitness for candidature.

Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma

The ACD awards a Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma to students who complete 4 and 8 units of the MMin program respectively. See the ACD Higher Education Handbook for more information about the core requirement units for these courses.

A candidate who already holds a Graduate Diploma in Ministry degree or equivalent may be granted advanced standing in the Master of Ministry.

Fee & Payment Options

Unit fee: $2003
Full course fees (16 units): $32048

Duration

2 years full time or 4 years part time (16 units)

Delivery

Face to face or online

Last day to enrol

4th August 2017

Units offered this year

Semester 1
Semester 2
Interpreting the New Testament
MINS1201

The unit gives an introduction to contemporary interpretation of the New Testament by reading it as a collection of different kinds of literature and by exploring the historical, cultural and social backgrounds of the New Testament writings. It introduces some methods used in the exegesis of biblical texts and explores some of the issues surrounding the application of the ancient writings to contemporary contexts. A series of incremental topics will be covered during the semester, presenting both an overview of the literature and specific study of representative sections of biblical material. The modules will include the Gospels and Acts, Pauline Writings, Other Christian approaches to the Judaic heritage (Hebrews, James, and Revelation) and Issues of canon and authority.

Lecturer: So an so
Introduction to Christian Thought
MINS1304

This unit introduces students to the study of Christian faith and to key doctrines. It outlines the content and method of Christian theology and explores the roles of history and Scripture and other resources in theological discourse. It introduces and examines selected Christian understandings of Christ, God, Trinity and Revelation, with attention to both the development of Protestant Reformation theology and in light of the contemporary Australian context.

Lecturer:
MINS1305 Reading Cultures
MINS1305

This unit will examine issues at the interface between Australian society and ministry. It will enable students to see ministry and ministers within a sociological context and to develop a greater social sensitivity about the ministry process. Three major themes will be discussed: the interface between sociology and ministry; the social dynamics of church communities; and churches interacting with Australian society.

Aims

The aims of this topic are to:

  • examine issues at the interface between society and ministry in an Australian context
  • examine the social dynamics of church communities
  • analyse the interaction between churches and Australian society
  • enable students to see ministry and ministers from a sociological perspective and to develop greater social sensitivity about the ministry process
  • provide an opportunity for students to engage in collaborative research in order to facilitate insights into Australian ministry through the process of praxis
Outcomes

List below, in alpha format, what key knowledge and skills students would be expected to attain by successfully completing this unit (link to assessment tasks (refer to 2.4 below)):

  • Constructed a field report in which they describe a community, its rationale for existence, observations about its work, and a review of ministry in the community
  • In collaboration with others, presented on a key area of sociology for ministry
  • Engaged collaboratively with set texts and various forms of media in order to explore social, economic, political, religious, ecological and educational perspectives in Australian society.
Prerequisites

None

Lecturer:
MINS1101/8209 Interpreting the Old Testament
MINS1101/8209

This unit gives an introduction to the contemporary interpretation of the Old Testament by reading it as a collection of diverse writings and by exploring its varied historical, cultural and social backgrounds. It introduces some methods used in the exegesis of biblical texts, and explores some the issues surrounding the application of the ancient writings to contemporary contexts. A series of discrete but incremental topics will be covered throughout the semester presenting both an overview of the literature and specific study of representative sections of biblical material. The modules will include the Pentateuch, Deuteronomistic History, Prophets, and Psalms and may include selections from other writings.

Aims

The aims of this topic are to:

  • gain a knowledge and understanding of the content, historical and geographical setting, literary forms and the leading theological themes of the Old Testament
  • have an understanding of the major types of critical study of the scriptures
  • develop skills in the study of the scriptures
  • have an appreciation of the meaning and significance of the Hebrew Scriptures for Jews and Christians
Outcomes

List below, in alpha format, what key knowledge and skills students would be expected to attain by successfully completing this unit (link to assessment tasks (refer to 2.4 below))

  • Read a selection of writings from the Old Testament and interpret them according to their original contexts.
  • Encounter the methods of biblical interpretation and describe their use and limitations
  • Explore ways of drawing contemporary relevance from the ancient writings.
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate, discuss and present orally the issues raised.
Prerequisites

None

Lecturer:

Our Master of Ministry is accredited through the Adelaide College of Divinity.

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