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Diploma of Ministry

Diploma of Ministry

Aim

Prepare yourself with the skills and knowledge for supporting mission within your local church, community, or workplace.

Focus

Students concentrate on developing their skills in biblical interpretation and preaching. They gain a foundational understanding of the history of Christian thought and theology, and choose from a number of electives related to youth and children’s ministry, media in ministry, and pastoral care.

The Diploma of Ministry is accredited by the Adelaide College of Divinity

 

Apply for this Course   Enrol in units

Fee & Payment Options

Unit fee: $1,665.00
Full course fees (8 units): $13,320.00

Duration

1 year full time or 2 years part time (8 units)

Delivery

Weekly, evening and intensive courses.
Face to face or online

Last day to enrol

August 3, 2018

Units offered this year

Semester 1
Semester 2
Interpreting the Old Testament
MINS1101

This unit gives an introduction to the contemporary interpretation of the Old Testament by reading it as a collection of diverse writings and by exploring its varied historical, cultural and social backgrounds. It introduces some methods used in the exegesis of biblical texts, and explores some the issues surrounding the application of the ancient writings to contemporary contexts. A series of discrete but incremental topics will be covered throughout the semester presenting both an overview of the literature and specific study of representative sections of biblical material. The modules will include the Pentateuch, Deuteronomistic History, Prophets, and Psalms and may include selections from other writings.

Aims

The aims of this topic are to:

  • gain a knowledge and understanding of the content, historical and geographical setting, literary forms and the leading theological themes of the Old Testament
  • have an understanding of the major types of critical study of the scriptures
  • develop skills in the study of the scriptures
  • have an appreciation of the meaning and significance of the Hebrew Scriptures for Jews and Christians
Outcomes

List below, in alpha format, what key knowledge and skills students would be expected to attain by successfully completing this unit (link to assessment tasks (refer to 2.4 below))

  • Read a selection of writings from the Old Testament and interpret them according to their original contexts.
  • Encounter the methods of biblical interpretation and describe their use and limitations
  • Explore ways of drawing contemporary relevance from the ancient writings.
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate, discuss and present orally the issues raised.
Prerequisites

None

Lecturer: Dr Paul Jones
Introduction to Christian Thought
MINS1304

Area: Missiology

Content

This unit introduces students to the study of theology at an introductory level. It outlines the content and method of Christian theology and explores the roles of Scripture and tradition in theological discourse through historical developments and in the present day.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to identify the history and scope of theological discourse
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically engage with contemporary approaches to Christian theology
  3. Students will be able to outline and describe the importance of theological doctrine to ministry
Lecturer: Dr John Frederick
Spirituality for 21st Century Disciples
MINS1601

Area: Christian Education and Discipleship

Content

The purpose of the unit is to provide students with the ability to articulate the biblical, spiritual and ethical bases for Christian discipleship, to reflect on the appropriation of these in their own lives as developing leaders, and to gain a general understanding of such issues for church members.

The unit is structured around four modules:

  1. An exploration of New Testament texts and theology regarding the nature of Christian discipleship
  2. An exploration of personal and communal practices of Christian discipleship as described in recent literature and the biographies of contemporary disciples, with students engaging in reflection on their own beliefs, values and practices
  3. An introductory understanding of the nature of Christian ethics in Australian society against a global context, and the implications for Christian beliefs, values and living
  4. An examination of a range of approaches to spiritual development in the Christian tradition, including contemporary approaches and consideration of forms of spiritual development appropriate to the student’s own

Learning Outcomes

  1. ability to explain biblical motifs of Christian discipleship as expressed in the New
  2. ability to identify formative practices of Christian discipleship, both corporate and individual,  and demonstrate some foundational practices suitable for personal
  3. ability to articulate and apply basic ethical frameworks for decision-making from a Christian perspective
  4. articulate an understanding of forms of spiritual development in the Christian tradition, and the ability to identify appropriate personal practices to foster

 

Lecturer: Simon Gomersall
Introduction to Christian Leadership
MINS1509

Area: Leadership

Content

The Introduction to Leadership unit is designed to assist in the formation of effective Christian leaders for contemporary ministry  and mission contexts. Students will explore the nature and dynamic of leadership, especially in relation to Christian ministry and mission, the value of effective leadership as integral to the mission and ministry of the church.

Topics covered may include: defining leadership; theology and leadership; leadership as influence; models of Christian leadership (leader as servant, shepherd, change-agent, manager); leadership styles; leadership qualities.

Learning Outcomes

  1. articulate definitions and understandings of leadership from the perspective of Christian theology in dialogue with secular leadership modes
  2. identify a number of models and styles of leadership and their applications to the given context and in relation to issues such as responsibility, power, authority and governance in general
  3. critically reflect on her/his personal experiences in leadership
  4. evaluate the culture and dynamics of a given
Lecturer: Nigel Rogers
Interpreting the New Testament
MINS1201

Area: Biblical Studies

Content

The unit gives an introduction to contemporary interpretation of the New Testament by reading it as a collection of different kinds of literature and by exploring the historical, cultural and social backgrounds of the New Testament writings. It introduces some methods used in the exegesis of biblical texts and explores some of the issues surrounding the application of the ancient writings to contemporary contexts. A series of incremental topics will be covered during the semester, presenting both an overview of the literature and specific study of representative sections of biblical material. The modules will include the Gospels and Acts, Pauline Writings, Other Christian approaches to the Judaic heritage (Hebrews, James, and Revelation) and Issues of canon and authority.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Read the various writings of the New Testament and interpret them according to their original
  2. Encounter the methods of biblical interpretation and describe their use and
  3. Explore ways of drawing contemporary relevance from specified
  4. Demonstrate the ability to articulate, discuss and present orally the issues raised.
Lecturer: Dr John Frederick
Reading Cultures
MINS1305

This unit will examine issues at the interface between Australian society and ministry. It will enable students to see ministry and ministers within a sociological context and to develop a greater social sensitivity about the ministry process. Three major themes will be discussed: the interface between sociology and ministry; the social dynamics of church communities; and churches interacting with Australian society.

Aims

The aims of this topic are to:

  1. examine issues at the interface between society and ministry in an Australian context
  2. examine the social dynamics of church communities
  3. analyse the interaction between churches and Australian society
  4. enable students to see ministry and ministers from a sociological perspective and to develop greater social sensitivity about the ministry process
  5. provide an opportunity for students to engage in collaborative research in order to facilitate insights into Australian ministry through the process of praxis
Outcomes
  1. Constructed a field report in which they describe a community, its rationale for existence, observations about its work, and a review of ministry in the community
  2. In collaboration with others, presented on a key area of sociology for ministry
  3. Engaged collaboratively with set texts and various forms of media in order to explore social, economic, political, religious, ecological and educational perspectives in Australian society.
Prerequisites

None

Lecturer: Lu Senituli
Beyond Sunday: An Introduction to Faith and Work
MINS1603

Area: Christian Education and Discipleship

Content

This unit includes:

  1. Biblical and theological foundations for a Christian approach to vocation, work and
  2. An exploration of the application of Christian discipleship to significant issues of 21stcentury life, globalisation, economic factors, influence of technology.
  3. An in-depth examination of key pastoral issues in the life of the worker, stress, anxiety, work/life balance, financial pressure, workplace bullying, and development of peer-based pastoral skills in relation to these.
  4. Principles of, and possibilities for, leisure and rest in 21stcentury Australian

Learning Outcomes

  1. develop a theology of vocation, work and
  2. analyse a range of issues that impact the wellbeing of individuals in the contemporary workplace, and explore a range of Christian
  3. identify ways in which the church can empower people to effectively live out a Christian approach to their vocation and
  4. demonstrate effective communication skills (written, verbal and technological).
Lecturer: Nigel Rogers
Human Being?
MINS2315

Content

This unit will introduce students to theological understandings of the human person. Students will be taken through: theological reflections on humanity as created in the imago Dei; understandings of original sin and original righteousness and the consequences of these understandings to contemporary theological anthropology and soteriology. Students will consider the role of the incarnation in the Christian understanding of the human person.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Outline and describe the development of theological anthropology within Christian theology.
  2. Identify the ways in which Christian understandings of Christology and ethics are influenced by theologies of original sin and original righteousness.
  3. Compare and contrast historical and contemporary theological anthropologies and show the outworking’s of these ideas in contemporary theological dialogue and ministry practice.
  4. Describe the contribution of theological anthropology to contemporary discussions of human rights and ethics.
Lecturer: Victoria Lorrimar
Evangelism, Conversion and the Mission of God
MINS2320

Area: Missiology

Content

This unit is designed to  assist leaders in forming and developing churches and faith communities in the task of evangelism. Students will examine the nature of Australian society and its implications for evangelism and the growth of the Church. They will explore understandings of the value of evangelism as integral to the mission and ministry of the church. They will develop skills and practices in implementing local church evangelism. They will explore some of the important issues around evangelism, conversion and the mission of God, including pluralism and postmodernity. Content could include theologies of evangelism and conversion, the Australian context in history, contemporary challenges,   models  and  practices  of   evangelistic churches, evangelism and special events and resources for evangelism today.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify major social, cultural and ecclesiastical trends that effect evangelism, conversion and the mission of
  2. Articulate a considered Biblical and theological rationale for evangelism and
  3. Present, and critically respond to, a number of evangelism styles and
  4. Develop skills and strategies in leading a Christian faith community to effective implementation of local and wider
  5. Develop skills and confidence in articulation of a range of understandings of the Christian gospel and
Lecturer:

Our Diploma of Ministry is accredited through the Adelaide College of Divinity.